End Notes

References and Endnotes

[i]  Talbot M, Atkinson K & Atkinson D (2003), Language and Power in the Modern World, EUP. (p.2.) “Resistance, contestation and struggle are the accompaniments of power.”

[iii]  Talbot M, Atkinson K & Atkinson D (2003), Language and Power in the Modern World, EUP (p.21). Although these features pertain to radio call-in programs, many of the same features are retained in television interviews and chat shows.

[iv]  Talbot M, Atkinson K & Atkinson D (2003), Language and Power in the Modern World, EUP (p.20). The idea of modelling structural sequences is related to conversation analysis of radio call-in programs (Hutchby 1996).

[v]  The niqab and burqa both cover the face, though the latter is thinner and more transparent than the former. The hijab, however, should cover the hair, ears, neck and breasts, but does not include covering the face. All schools of thought agree that women are obliged to cover themselves with the hijab from puberty until menopause when in the presence of men qualified to marry them (if they were free to marry). Where the schools of thought do not agree is whether or not women must cover their faces, too. Generally speaking, covering for women includes wearing clothes that stretch all the way down to their feet and are loose and baggy. In de facto practice, some Muslims do not think the hijab is necessary at all, or that the hijab needs only to cover the women’s hair. Not to wear the hijab is a sin, but does not take a person out of Islam.

[vi]  Fairclough N, (2000)  New Labour, New Language, in Talbot M, Atkinson K & Atkinson D (Eds.), Language and Power in the Modern World, EUP (pp.63-67)

[vii]  Masjid is the Arabic word for mosque.

[viii]  Fairclough N, (2000)  New Labour, New Language, in Talbot M, Atkinson K & Atkinson D (Eds.), Language and Power in the Modern World, EUP (p.69)

[ix]  Sheldon A, (1996)  Research on Language and Social Interaction, in Talbot M, Atkinson K & Atkinson D (Eds.), Language and Power in the Modern World, EUP (p.157)

[x] Ochs E & Taylor C, (1995)  The ‘Father knows best’ dynamic in dinnertime narratives, in Talbot M, Atkinson K & Atkinson D (Eds.), Language and Power in the Modern World, EUP (p.179)

[xi]  Appendix: Official Transcript from SBS. (p.19)

[xii]  One such misunderstanding is, perhaps, regarding the behaviour that Khadija displayed by rapidly capitulating as weakness, especially when contrasted to Sibel’s quick victory against the same opponent on her behalf. Yet she showed strength in not pursuing something that ultimately was not worthwhile. In Islam, one of the principles is that one knocks on a door thrice, and if there is no response – you walk away. Either the person does not want to interact with you, or they cannot at the time. She politely requested space to speak three times. Another tradition tells us that the strong one is not he who can throw the other down, but he who can hold his tongue when tempted to loosen it. Finally, Allah says in the Quran, Chapter 28, verse 55, that Muslims, “when they hear vain talk, they withdraw from it”. Khadija applied all these precepts, so, Islamically, she portrayed inner strength, perhaps more than the rest of the Muslims present altogether.

Read On: Appendix 1: The Cast and the VIPS

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